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A Quarterly Newsletter
July, 2001
Volume 1, Number 3
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Inside

PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE
"Value Added..." Justify
the VALUE

FOCUSING IN ON:
OSHA's revised respiratory protection standard,
29 CFR 1910.134
effective April 8, 1998

MAKING THE BEST CALL
"14 Minutes per day, per
employee in time lost
calculates into BIG $$$"

ASPERGILLUS:
The seconds fungi in our
series on Indoor Air Quality...
Toxin Exposure

ROLAND'S CORNER
Medical gas system
maintenance

IMPORTANT DATES

The Mission of Compliance OnLine is to Assist Client "Partners" in Reducing Environmental Risk, Protect Facility Assets and the Bottom Line. Our Goal Is to Provide High Quality Regulatory and Compliance Management services Related to Industrial Hygiene, Safety and Building Engineering. At the Same Time, Allow Our Client "Partners" to Confidently Rely on the Experience and Expertise of Our Company's Specialists.
 

Making the Best Call

Strategic Environmental Management (SEM)

Indoor Air Quality (IAQ)

BACKGROUND
As management continues to recognize the importance of healthy, comfortable, and productive environments, awareness and demand for good Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) increases. Managerial policies and programs, which help reduce operational costs and contain liability exposure should be adopted while improving compliance performance.

EMPLOYEE PRODUCTIVITY
The Occupational Safety Health Administration (OSHA) points out an average time loss of 14 minutes per day per employee (3% cost) in productivity due to poor indoor air quality. IAQ deficiencies can have other managerial consequences including ongoing employee health problems, strained employee relations, and the positioning of tort liability exposure. These are all factors which affect operations expenditure and profits.

POLLUTION SOURCES & CONTROL
Indoor air pollution is caused by an accumulation of contaminants that occur primarily from inside the building, although some originate outdoors. Common sources of indoor air pollution include: organic chemicals, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), biological contaminants, respirable particles, pesticides, formaldehyde, tobacco smoke, and radon.

By conducting comprehensive surveys and reviews of processes, work practices, ventilation efficiency, and engineering controls, potential health hazards in your workplace can be identified. Once identified, specific hazards can be evaluated using various monitoring techniques and controlled by developing safe work procedures, codes of practice, more efficient engineering controls and long term strategies.

INVESTIGATIVE PROCEDURES

HEALTH HAZARD ASSESSMENTS

  • Chemical Contaminants
  • Biological Contaminants
  • Volatile Organic Compounds
  • Asbestos
  • Respirable Particles
  • Carbon Dioxide (CO2)
  • Carbon Monoxide (CO)
  • Pesticides
  • Environmental Tobacco Smoke
  • Nitrogen Dioxide
  • Formaldehyde
  • Lead
  • Radon
  • Legionella
  • Ventilation Efficiency

SOURCE CONTROL

AIR QUALITY MONITORING

MITIGATION PLANNING

FOLLOW-UP INSPECTIONS

Thomas M. Krawchuk
Environmental Analysis, Inc.

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Compliance OnLine, Inc.
7720 East Gelding Road, Suite 100
Scottsdale, Arizona 85260
(480) 483-7966 ~ Fax: (480) 922-1258 ~ Nationwide: 1-800-359-7190
 
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